Review: F&SF, May/June 2019 (at Tangent)

This issue of F&SF is markedly populated by familiar, ideological, misanthropic, underplotted stories which tend to focus on dysfunctional spouses and parents. One of the few exceptions (though a little cynical about human nature, itself) is a reprint of an obscure picaresque fantasy and it’s also the best story in the issue, though a few others have their points of interest and elements of merit.

Continue reading at Tangent.

I don’t ordinarily review reprints but didn’t read the blurb at the front that acknowledged its reprint status until I’d already reviewed it. Tangent doesn’t review reprints at all, so here’s what I wrote on “Sternutative Sortilege” by Matthew Hughes:

Raffalon is a thief who is looking for a new home after the partial destruction of the city he’d previously called home which was not at all his fault, no sir. Instead of setting up comfortably in virgin territory, he finds himself captured by a cult who uses their sneezing prisoners as tools of divination and must escape before their sneezing powders kill him.

This picaresque tale (one of several with this protagonist) has a style that smacks slightly more of artificiality than artifice and a conclusion that is a little underwhelming but the concept and phrasing of “sternutative sortilege” is as amusing as it is disgusting and the structure and pacing is sound, though the mortal threat to the protagonist initially depends on some wasteful priests who don’t seem to appreciate simple pepper. All in all, it’s good entertainment.

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