Review: Clarkesworld #151, April 2019

Clarkesworld #151, April 2019

Original Fiction:

  • “The Last Eagle” by Natalia Theodoridou (science fictional short story)
  • “Ripen” by Yukimi Ogawa (fantasy novelette)
  • “Gaze of Robot, Gaze of Bird” by Eric Schwitzgebel (science fiction short story)
  • “Social Darwinism” by Priya Chand (science fiction short story)
  • “Skyscrapers in the Sand” by Y.M. Pang (science fictional short story)

The original stories in this issue of Clarkesworld include something I can’t see as SF, two pieces which provide only indifferent tokens of SF, and two more vigorously science fictional tales.

Ripen” feels like a strange hybrid of science fiction and fantasy involving an island of colorful people interacting with mainland tourists while menial colorless people try to get by. When a tourist and a colorful person with skin problems get involved with some colorless people on the illegal edge of the makeup industry, someone may get hurt. Akin to last issue’s “Smile,” the story is rife with uncorrected solecisms though they generally weren’t as bad as last month’s story, aside from things like someone demanding to see Madam’s crack. The story wasn’t especially interesting but I did appreciate the positively shifting appearance (beyond the skin-deep) of one of the characters.

Skyscrapers” is an unsatisfying elliptical short tale about an ill and/or older woman memorializing an old flame via a time capsule. The speculative element is that she’s doing so in an ecologically ruined Shanghai.

A female becoming a male and someone who may be male are searching for a third who, in turn, has gone looking for “The Last Eagle” and the pair find something. There’s very little story in these 6000 words and less science fiction with only the symbols of a future post-war period in which the third they’re searching for is an “Artificial.”

The protagonist of “Social Darwinism” is woman who has been modified to be an attention-whore. She’s offered advertising minutes if she’ll participate in the agenda of a shadowy group of differently modified people to sway public opinion to do away with her kind. It’s good that this story has integral SF elements (however thematically/symbolically deployed) but they are confusingly presented and the actual core of the story is repellently akin to a daytime TV show.

Finally, “Gaze of Robot, Gaze of Bird” is about a “complicated toaster” and a “knot of fuzz.” The former takes the latter to an alien world and begins to modify that world, along with its prokaryotic life. Along the way, we learn that the robot has been sent out by a species that has been wiped out long before our tale starts with a stuffed monkey as a sort of ideal of beauty and teleological goal for recreating the dead species. This is one of those stories where words fail me, but it’s certainly one of my favorite stories of the year, joining Auston Habershaw’s “Applied Linguistics” (Jan./Feb. 2019 Analog) and Tom Greene’s “Better” (Mar./Apr. 2019 Analog) in a triptych of recent rare examples of Real Science Fiction™. There is one overt didactic paragraph I wish could have been more dramatically integrated with the main story and one can certainly argue about the odd morphological rather than, say, genetic approach to the task and there is certainly an interesting moral conundrum for the reader to play with which can put a sinister interpretation on the events but the latter two are as much virtues as vices, being among the things which give the reader much to think about. This is a short story which operates on gargantuan scales of time and space, has an intriguing combination of hard-edged objective narration and earned, unashamed sentimentality, and has a protagonist in J11-L that is worthy of joining the pantheon of Asimovian robots. I vigorously recommend this tale.

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