Links (2017-10-16)

This is my 100th post here at Featured Futures. I’ve been at this 300 days (11 last year and 289 of this). So happy century-stuff to me. 🙂 Now, on with the links:

Humor

The Art of Darkness brings us some dark humor (I especially liked the one with the carny) and (link post to link post) a list of links which include a flabbergasting nativity scene and some pretty cool “dethskulpt-ured” mugs.

From the “You’re Not Alone Dept.” xkcd gives us a comic about “State Borders.” He missed my biggest complaint, though – I’ll give Canada the stuff he points out but I want all the contiguous land on the southeastern side of the St. Lawrence in exchange. Not sure how I feel about Baja California… Hm…

Politics

Because I know you can’t get enough, here are a couple more gerrymandering links: CBS has the Supreme Court 101 article on the Wisconsin case (which will likely decide the fate of our democracy) and here’s another cool math link which gives us the cracking and packing primer. You don’t want to be cracked or packed, do you?

Science

Cool stuff in science: dwarf planet Haumea has rings. Bridging science fiction and science: SF writer James L. Cambias blogs the Tennessee Valley Interstellar Workshop in three posts: a-one, and a-two, and a-three. Forget the flying car – I want my starship.

Science Fiction

Now fully into the SF: I came across this remarkable review of Hal Clement’s Cycle of Fire at Lauren’s Super Science Fiction Blog. I disagree that “[t]he objective for the reader was to find mistakes” in the worldbuilding of hard SF novels – I think it’s an objective (which is maybe what the reviewer meant) but the primary objective is to be enthralled by an adventure in a credible but almost unimaginable world in which science and reason are paramount. But aside from that, as a big fan of Clement, I felt a great sympathy with this review, not least because the reviewer was very imaginative and sympathetic.

Tunes

And now for the musical portion of our shew. Inspired by 100 posts in 300 days, here are pieces of music from about 300 and 100 years ago and about 300 and 100 months ago…

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